Roasted Beets, Carrots and Buttercrunch Lettuce

 

I tried something new in my garden this winter.  I was given a piece  of white garden fabric this past fall which I put over one of my raised beds.  I stapled both long sides to bamboo poles the same length which kept it in place.  I threw a package of lettuce seeds down and covered up the bed with my fabric.  It gave a safe haven for my Butter Crunch lettuce to grow – safe from the deer and the frost (although, everyone looked like a genius this warm winter) and the result was early robust lettuce.  What better than to combine it with beets and carrots, other cold weather vegetables, which I did not grow, because that would take more perseverance than I have…

4 Beets peeled and cut in quarters

4 Carrots, peeled and cut into 2″ pieces

1  Tbs Canola Oil

3 cups Butter Crunch Lettuce

 

1/4 cup Seasoned Rice Vinegar

3/4 cup Canola Oil

1 tsp Dijon Mustard

  • Heat the oven to 375 degrees
  • Place the beets and carrots on an aluminum foil lined cookie sheet and toss with the canola oil
  • Roast the vegetables for about an hour until tender
  • Let cool slightly and toss with a bit of the dressing and the lettuce

This salad would be great with Cambozola Blue or Fresh Goat Cheese or Rosemary Pecans (see post)

I use rubber gloves to peel the fresh beets – I love pink but not on my hands

This is what happens when you throw a few lettuce seeds in the garden in the fall, and cover it with garden cloth…

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2 Responses to Roasted Beets, Carrots and Buttercrunch Lettuce

  1. bg says:

    This looks fantastic. Tell me more about the cloth? Do you think it worked well, because of the mild late winter – or it would always work in the Mid-Atlantic. Great stuff ET.

    BG

    • Thanks Brad! The cloth is called Floating Row Cover – it lets in 85% of the sunlight and protects from frost down to 28 degrees and helps to keep the soil moist for germination. Yes I do think it was so succesful due to the mild winter – but it gave germination process a big boost this past fall, which would be beneficial no matter how cold the winter becomes.

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